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Applied Floor Systems of New England

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Reviews Applied Floor Systems of New England

Applied Floor Systems of New England Reviews (2)

Note that Applied Floor Systems is a division of Concrete Reactions, both operated by [redacted] discussed with us in July 2014 the various epoxies (from Citadel Floors, National Polymers and Everlast) he would apply to the 24x24 concrete floor of our cheese making room at a total cost of $4950. Within a month after application in August, the floor coating was damaged from regular use. We talked to [redacted] on the phone, exchanged emails, and he came out to see the damage himself. Following several emails negotiating a solution, [redacted] agreed in November to come out, free of charge, to put down one final layer of 85% solids polyaspartic. We confirmed his appointment by email on December 3th, but he called the same day to say that he would no longer be able to do the job because his doctor told him that he could no longer work with solvents in any way due to severe health problems. Having done the first application with an employee, we asked him if he could send him out, but he refused. He also refused to recommend anyone else in the business. Unbelievably, he told us that he would send the materials and that we could find someone to do the job. Needless to say that we have not received any materials.Meanwhile, we had a third party called Brians business under the pretense of needing an epoxy floor for a kitchen. [redacted] said he was interested in the job and asked for an email with more details!There is clearly an issue about the way Applied Floor Systems run their business and being completely unprofessional about it. [redacted] has not honored his implicit warranty of workmanship by trying by all means to avoid the extra work needed.Desired SettlementIf [redacted] is unable or unwilling to correct the issues that we have with our epoxy floor, as he agreed to, he should refund us the money necessary to get another contractor to correct the situation.Business Response In July of 2014 I met with the customer to determine her flooring needs in her cheese processing facility. There are many different systems with different levels of durability and cost. Based on our discussions I recommended a low build epoxy flake floor with a Speed Cove integral cove base. The floor I recommended was 1/4 flake broadcast, we had previously installed thousands of square feet of this system and never had an issue. The customer wanted to go with a 1/16 inch flake because it had a similar texture to what she had seen in the past. We had also installed this type of floor with out issue, and I expected it would meet her needs based on what she told me. Her other option would have been a trowel applied Everlast Floor system that would have been almost double the cost of the floor we installed, however I did believe the less expensive broadcast floor would meet her needs.We installed the floor exactly as quoted and according to the manufacturers installation guidelines. We even performed an extra preparation step that was not in the original quote at no cost to insure proper adhesion.Upon completion of the installation the floor was satisfactory in every aspect.After a period of time the customer contacted me about a chip in the floor and another part that the plumber damaged when he installed the sink.I made arrangements with the customer to come out and address her concerns regarding the floor. Upon inspection of the floor and doing an adhesion test I determined that the floor was performing exactly as it should be. The chip in the floor was caused by the dropping of the hose coupling to her vat. Floors are not warrantied against impact damage, however I was concerned about durability not because of any defect in materials or workmanship but because in hindsight I should have insisted on the 1/4 flake floor instead. I offered several solutions to floor that I would do for the cost of materials. One of them was a complete re-broad cast with 1/4 flake. She decided that she did not have it in her budget. I suggested that at the very least an additional top coat of polyaspartic urethane would probably provide enough protection for her floor if she was careful. The cost of materials would have been just under $400. I firmly believed my offers were very fair, she felt that I should do the top coat for free. I finally agreed to do the top coat for free because I felt it was the right thing to do and I wanted her to be a satisfied customer.I ordered the materials and told her I would get in touch when I could schedule the job in. In the meantime over a period of many weeks I had been experiencing breathing problems, abdominal pains and other severe symptoms. I went to the doctor and began the diagnosis process. The short version of the long story is that I have developed a type of chemical insensitivity over the course of 25 year career working with solvents. I knew for sometime that they were bothering me, but ignored the symptoms as this was my business and how I supported my family.I made the very difficult decision to immediately cease installing solvent based epoxy/urethane floors. I called the customer to inform her of my situation and offered to ship her the materials and provide instructions on how to apply the top coat. She asked if there was anyone who I could recommend and the answer was no. Not because I would not recommend anyone, but because it was not feasible for someone to travel to her place and and do the install for free. My employee had already taken another full time job in a different industry. However, during our conversation this was a moot point as she agreed to accept the materials and get someone to install the top coat.At about this time my primary concern (along with my health issues) was to get moved out of my space and find someone to take over my business as my income stream had ceased. Just because I stopped working does not mean my phone ceased to ring, I continued to take calls and respond to e-mails from people inquiring about floors. Once I received their information I would make a determination of whether or not I could pass the job along to an associate who does similar installs to what I used to do, but on a much larger scale. He offered me a finders fee for any work that I sent his way. He would not have done the re-coat for my customer for under $1000. That is why I did not recommend him.Because I was in the process of moving out of my shop I did not immediately send the materials to my customer - this was my biggest error and I take full responsibility for it. However, I was concerned if I was not out of my space by the end of the month I would have to pay another months rent which I could not afford.About a week or so later I received a call from the customers general contractor about doing the floor. I explained to him my situation and that I was not doing any more work and that I had already explained it to the customer.He said that she knew I was still working because she had a friend call up and inquire about a floor. Needless to say I was extremely upset by her "sting" operation. At that point I decided that I would no longer have any dealings with the customer. The contractor understood and agreed to take the materials and do the floor if I gave him instructions.The materials were shipped to the customer's general contractor in January. I never heard from him. Earlier today when I learned of this complaint I called and e-mailed the contractor, but was unable to reach him. I also noticed that the Revdex.com had tried to contact me earlier regarding this complaint, both by phone call and regular mail. Since the discontinuation of the business and closing of my shop I am not properly getting my mail forwarded from my previous address and it was only when the Revdex.com left a message regarding a complaint did I respond to their call. I still have the business phone number because of previously paid for advertising in the Blue Book. I forward appropriate calls to another vendor. I am in the process of completely dissolving my business entity, the only reason I am responding to this complaint is because both sides of the story need to be told. Consumer Response (The consumer indicated he/she DID NOT accept the response from the business.)Regardless of whether or not [redacted] is dissolving his business and his reasons, he made a commitment to deliver a product and service, which he did not uphold. I regret any health problems he may have, but [redacted] and I agreed on a solution (to install free of charge the 85% polyaspartic topcoat) that he then did not uphold.While he has sent the materials to my contractor, [redacted] has neither offered a credit for the work he promised to do, nor was he willing to offer an alternative installer (why hide your colleagues from your customers, specially if you are closing down your business?).Final Business Response The customer has failed to acknowledge that she agreed to accept the materials to be installed by someone of her choosing if I shipped them to her and gave her installation instructions. This agreement was made when I called her and explained to her that I would not be able to install the product, but would ship it to her and provide installation instructions. At the writing of her first complaint, she was not aware that her contractor had indeed received the materials, but had not notified her. Her request for a credit for the free application that I was originally going to provide is unreasonable, especially since she agreed to accept the materials. I did provide the materials at no charge and her contractor agreed to apply the new top coat. There is no issue to correct, the plumber damaged the floor when he installed the sink and the floor is not warranted against impact damage. I did offer to install an additional coat of polyaspartic to provide extra protection to the floor-not because of any defect in materials or workmanship regarding the original installation, but because I wanted the customer to be satisfied. I regret that I cannot install the product, but I have provided the material for free.[redacted]Final Consumer Response (The consumer indicated he/she DID NOT accept the response from the business.)It is unfortunate that I must repeat myself.The business owner is now changing his story by saying that there is no issue with floor. When we were still speaking, he agreed that there was an issue and that he would fix it. He backed out of the agreement and I reluctantly agreed to accept the materials (which he did not send until I wrote this complaint). Since he offered me no alternative, I enlisted my contractor (who recommended the business initially) to find out if he could convince [redacted] to revise his position and do the work he had initially agreed he would do. All this to say that I have never changed the nature of my complaint, which was that I paid too much for an unsatisfactory job.

Note that Applied Floor Systems is a division of Concrete Reactions, both operated by [redacted] discussed with us in July 2014 the various epoxies (from Citadel Floors, National Polymers and Everlast) he would apply to the 24x24 concrete floor of our cheese making room at a total cost of $4950. Within a month after application in August, the floor coating was damaged from regular use. We talked to [redacted] on the phone, exchanged emails, and he came out to see the damage himself. Following several emails negotiating a solution, [redacted] agreed in November to come out, free of charge, to put down one final layer of 85% solids polyaspartic. We confirmed his appointment by email on December 3th, but he called the same day to say that he would no longer be able to do the job because his doctor told him that he could no longer work with solvents in any way due to severe health problems. Having done the first application with an employee, we asked him if he could send him out, but he refused. He also refused to recommend anyone else in the business. Unbelievably, he told us that he would send the materials and that we could find someone to do the job. Needless to say that we have not received any materials.Meanwhile, we had a third party called Brians business under the pretense of needing an epoxy floor for a kitchen. [redacted] said he was interested in the job and asked for an email with more details!There is clearly an issue about the way Applied Floor Systems run their business and being completely unprofessional about it. [redacted] has not honored his implicit warranty of workmanship by trying by all means to avoid the extra work needed.Desired SettlementIf [redacted] is unable or unwilling to correct the issues that we have with our epoxy floor, as he agreed to, he should refund us the money necessary to get another contractor to correct the situation.Business Response In July of 2014 I met with the customer to determine her flooring needs in her cheese processing facility. There are many different systems with different levels of durability and cost. Based on our discussions I recommended a low build epoxy flake floor with a Speed Cove integral cove base. The floor I recommended was 1/4 flake broadcast, we had previously installed thousands of square feet of this system and never had an issue. The customer wanted to go with a 1/16 inch flake because it had a similar texture to what she had seen in the past. We had also installed this type of floor with out issue, and I expected it would meet her needs based on what she told me. Her other option would have been a trowel applied Everlast Floor system that would have been almost double the cost of the floor we installed, however I did believe the less expensive broadcast floor would meet her needs.We installed the floor exactly as quoted and according to the manufacturers installation guidelines. We even performed an extra preparation step that was not in the original quote at no cost to insure proper adhesion.Upon completion of the installation the floor was satisfactory in every aspect.After a period of time the customer contacted me about a chip in the floor and another part that the plumber damaged when he installed the sink.I made arrangements with the customer to come out and address her concerns regarding the floor. Upon inspection of the floor and doing an adhesion test I determined that the floor was performing exactly as it should be. The chip in the floor was caused by the dropping of the hose coupling to her vat. Floors are not warrantied against impact damage, however I was concerned about durability not because of any defect in materials or workmanship but because in hindsight I should have insisted on the 1/4 flake floor instead. I offered several solutions to floor that I would do for the cost of materials. One of them was a complete re-broad cast with 1/4 flake. She decided that she did not have it in her budget. I suggested that at the very least an additional top coat of polyaspartic urethane would probably provide enough protection for her floor if she was careful. The cost of materials would have been just under $400. I firmly believed my offers were very fair, she felt that I should do the top coat for free. I finally agreed to do the top coat for free because I felt it was the right thing to do and I wanted her to be a satisfied customer.I ordered the materials and told her I would get in touch when I could schedule the job in. In the meantime over a period of many weeks I had been experiencing breathing problems, abdominal pains and other severe symptoms. I went to the doctor and began the diagnosis process. The short version of the long story is that I have developed a type of chemical insensitivity over the course of 25 year career working with solvents. I knew for sometime that they were bothering me, but ignored the symptoms as this was my business and how I supported my family.I made the very difficult decision to immediately cease installing solvent based epoxy/urethane floors. I called the customer to inform her of my situation and offered to ship her the materials and provide instructions on how to apply the top coat. She asked if there was anyone who I could recommend and the answer was no. Not because I would not recommend anyone, but because it was not feasible for someone to travel to her place and and do the install for free. My employee had already taken another full time job in a different industry. However, during our conversation this was a moot point as she agreed to accept the materials and get someone to install the top coat.At about this time my primary concern (along with my health issues) was to get moved out of my space and find someone to take over my business as my income stream had ceased. Just because I stopped working does not mean my phone ceased to ring, I continued to take calls and respond to e-mails from people inquiring about floors. Once I received their information I would make a determination of whether or not I could pass the job along to an associate who does similar installs to what I used to do, but on a much larger scale. He offered me a finders fee for any work that I sent his way. He would not have done the re-coat for my customer for under $1000. That is why I did not recommend him.Because I was in the process of moving out of my shop I did not immediately send the materials to my customer - this was my biggest error and I take full responsibility for it. However, I was concerned if I was not out of my space by the end of the month I would have to pay another months rent which I could not afford.About a week or so later I received a call from the customers general contractor about doing the floor. I explained to him my situation and that I was not doing any more work and that I had already explained it to the customer.He said that she knew I was still working because she had a friend call up and inquire about a floor. Needless to say I was extremely upset by her "sting" operation. At that point I decided that I would no longer have any dealings with the customer. The contractor understood and agreed to take the materials and do the floor if I gave him instructions.The materials were shipped to the customer's general contractor in January. I never heard from him. Earlier today when I learned of this complaint I called and e-mailed the contractor, but was unable to reach him. I also noticed that the Revdex.com had tried to contact me earlier regarding this complaint, both by phone call and regular mail. Since the discontinuation of the business and closing of my shop I am not properly getting my mail forwarded from my previous address and it was only when the Revdex.com left a message regarding a complaint did I respond to their call. I still have the business phone number because of previously paid for advertising in the Blue Book. I forward appropriate calls to another vendor. I am in the process of completely dissolving my business entity, the only reason I am responding to this complaint is because both sides of the story need to be told. Consumer Response (The consumer indicated he/she DID NOT accept the response from the business.)Regardless of whether or not [redacted] is dissolving his business and his reasons, he made a commitment to deliver a product and service, which he did not uphold. I regret any health problems he may have, but [redacted] and I agreed on a solution (to install free of charge the 85% polyaspartic topcoat) that he then did not uphold.While he has sent the materials to my contractor, [redacted] has neither offered a credit for the work he promised to do, nor was he willing to offer an alternative installer (why hide your colleagues from your customers, specially if you are closing down your business?).Final Business Response The customer has failed to acknowledge that she agreed to accept the materials to be installed by someone of her choosing if I shipped them to her and gave her installation instructions. This agreement was made when I called her and explained to her that I would not be able to install the product, but would ship it to her and provide installation instructions. At the writing of her first complaint, she was not aware that her contractor had indeed received the materials, but had not notified her. Her request for a credit for the free application that I was originally going to provide is unreasonable, especially since she agreed to accept the materials. I did provide the materials at no charge and her contractor agreed to apply the new top coat. There is no issue to correct, the plumber damaged the floor when he installed the sink and the floor is not warranted against impact damage. I did offer to install an additional coat of polyaspartic to provide extra protection to the floor-not because of any defect in materials or workmanship regarding the original installation, but because I wanted the customer to be satisfied. I regret that I cannot install the product, but I have provided the material for free.[redacted]Final Consumer Response (The consumer indicated he/she DID NOT accept the response from the business.)It is unfortunate that I must repeat myself.The business owner is now changing his story by saying that there is no issue with floor. When we were still speaking, he agreed that there was an issue and that he would fix it. He backed out of the agreement and I reluctantly agreed to accept the materials (which he did not send until I wrote this complaint). Since he offered me no alternative, I enlisted my contractor (who recommended the business initially) to find out if he could convince [redacted] to revise his position and do the work he had initially agreed he would do. All this to say that I have never changed the nature of my complaint, which was that I paid too much for an unsatisfactory job.

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Description: Floor Coatings - Epoxy/Polyurethane

Address: 3A Condon Way, Hopedale, Massachusetts, United States, 01747

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