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Dilley Floors Reviews (15)

Complaint: [redacted] I am rejecting this response because:IT HAS NOT BEEN DAYS SINCE 5/I WOULD LIKE TO REPLY THAT I AM NOT HAPPY WITH DILLEY FLOORS' RESPONSE AND PROPOSAL TO RESOLVE THIS DISPUTE THEY HAVE NOT INSTALLED THE FLOORS TO STANDARDS SET FORTH IN THE INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE MANUFACTURER AND HAVE NOT FIXED THE END JOINT PROBLEMTHEY HAVE NOT CONFIRMED WHETHER OR NOT THE TRANSITION PIECES INSTALLED AROUND THE HEARTH ARE GLUED OR HAVE THEY ALSO BEEN NAILED TO THE SUBFLOOR OR THE FLOORING ITSELF [redacted] Sincerely, [redacted] ***

Complaint: [redacted] I am rejecting this response because: IT HAS NOT BEEN DAYS SINCE 5/I WOULD LIKE TO REPLY THAT I AM NOT HAPPY WITH DILLEY FLOORS' RESPONSE AND PROPOSAL TO RESOLVE THIS DISPUTE THEY HAVE NOT INSTALLED THE FLOORS TO STANDARDS SET FORTH IN THE INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE MANUFACTURER AND HAVE NOT FIXED THE END JOINT PROBLEMTHEY HAVE NOT CONFIRMED WHETHER OR NOT THE TRANSITION PIECES INSTALLED AROUND THE HEARTH ARE GLUED OR HAVE THEY ALSO BEEN NAILED TO THE SUBFLOOR OR THE FLOORING ITSELF [redacted] Sincerely, [redacted] ***

Complaint: [redacted] I am rejecting this response because: there are a lot of falsifications within this response [redacted] did not in fact observe a sump pump in my basementI advised him that I do have a sump pump in my basementIf he had observed the sump pump in my basement, he would have also observed a dehumidifier in my basement that runs to remove any moisture Also, there was never any leaks in the bathroom as [redacted] allegesThe finish he is refering to on the bathroom floor is another example of poor and defective materialsI understand that wood expands and contracts, however, not to the extent in which I have explained Another issue which has not been addressed are the nails that are protruding through the floor, yet again exhibiting poor and defective materials I feel that even though it is years after installation, I was advised upon purchasing this wood floor that it would last at least years because of the way the floor is manufactured To me this means that the flooring is either defective and/or the installation was not completed properly I am simply asking that the matter be rectified as I feel that years is not unreasonable given the expectation that the floor would last at least years a before proceeding further Respectfully, Michael Coviello

In July of Dilley Floors LLC was contracted by Mrs. *** *** to install flooring that she had purchased from *** *** On July 3rd, we installed her productAfter we finished installing the preferred way that I have done for years, Mrs*** did not like itShe
wanted an excessive expansion gap around the perimeter. We went back at our cost and made corrections to fit Mrs***' stipulationsShe was happy and paid us.Approximately eight months later Mrs*** called and said that the floor had shrunk and asked if we could fix it at her costMrs. *** had been concerned about buckling when, in fact, the opposite occurredThe floor shrunk.Two of my men and I went back to rectify the problem
The flooring was bamboo that she had bought from *** *** and was manufactured in ***It was a very inferior productWe have worked with bamboo for the past years and have never seen it shrinkMrs*** is placing the blame in the wrong placeShe should pursue her issues with *** ***
Sincerely,
*** ***
Dilley Floors LLC

Mrs***' main problem is that she bought inexpensive, inferior wood from *** *** If Mrs***' problem is with the trim: When we originally did the trim work, we did it as is should beMrs*** insisted that we change it and do it incorrectlyShe was happy and paid usWe have tried to accommodate Mrs***' demands but have not been able to make her happyAs stated previously, the latest problem arose from the shrinkage of the really bad woodMrs*** should address her problems with *** *** In regards to the repair: We did the best we could with what we had to work withWe are willing to refund $ (1/of the repair price) and would like to close out this accountMrs*** is too difficult to please

What exactly is needed in terms of information from the contract?
***

In July of Dilley Floors LLC was contracted by Mrs. *** *** to install flooring that she had purchased from *** *** On July 3rd, we installed her productAfter we finished installing the preferred way that I have done for years, Mrs*** did not like itShe
wanted an excessive expansion gap around the perimeter. We went back at our cost and made corrections to fit Mrs***' stipulationsShe was happy and paid us.Approximately eight months later Mrs*** called and said that the floor had shrunk and asked if we could fix it at her costMrs. *** had been concerned about buckling when, in fact, the opposite occurredThe floor shrunk.Two of my men and I went back to rectify the problemThe flooring was bamboo that she had bought from *** *** and was manufactured in ***It was a very inferior productWe have worked with bamboo for the past years and have never seen it shrinkMrs*** is placing the blame in the wrong placeShe should pursue her issues with *** *** Sincerely,*** ***Dilley Floors LLC

Mrs. [redacted]' main problem is that she bought inexpensive, inferior wood from [redacted] If Mrs. [redacted]' problem is with the trim: When we originally did the trim work, we did it as is should be. Mrs. [redacted] insisted that we change it and do it incorrectly. She was happy and paid us. We have tried to accommodate Mrs. [redacted]' demands but have not been able to make her happy. As stated previously, the latest problem arose from the shrinkage of the really bad wood. Mrs. [redacted] should address her problems with [redacted] 
In regards to the repair: We did the best we could with what we had to work with. We are willing to refund $ 100.00 (1/2 of the repair price) and would like to close out this account. Mrs. [redacted] is too difficult to please.

Re: ID [redacted]
 
The purpose of this letter is to respond to [redacted] complaint concerning his expectation of a five year warranty for work performed in January of 2009.
Wood has the ability to absorb moisture and,...

in doing this, expand in size. When heat is applied to the atmosphere, the wood dries and then reverts to the original size. This puts stress on the wood and sometimes causes it to crack or split. Upon inspection of [redacted] home on April 3, 2014, I observed a sump pump in his basement. This indicates the existence of water. The sump pump will remove standing water but not the dampness of the basement. Over a period of 5 years this dampness and drying of the environment could have a huge effect on the wood in [redacted] home.
It is apparent that [redacted] bathroom had a leak. When wood gets wet from water it expands and pushes against adjoining boards. When it dries, there is not pressure to push the boards back to their original place; thus leaving a space.
Dilley Floors LLC offered to work on this area of the floor at a very reasonable price for labor and materials. [redacted] has declined our offer.
[redacted]
Dilley Floors LLC

Complaint: [redacted]
Mr [redacted] said he has been doing this for yearsHE did not install the floorsMen working for his company installed the floors. If he or his employees were unfamiliar with installing pre-finished "clic" ( floating )bamboo flooring he should have refused the job or asked for the installation instructions.Per my meeting with [redacted] prior to the last repair, ( believe it was March 20th, [redacted] said they were going to install quarter round over the gap against the dining room/foyer wall. Fix the gaps surrounding the den/foyer wallFix the gap in front of the hearth and a gap in the flooring to the right of the hearth. He said I had eonugh flooring left over to cover the fix. I supplied quarter roundWhen the men from [redacted] came to repair on March 26, 2015, my brother
called and said they needed more flooring. I purchased more flooring
and transition pieces and glue. They did not install the quarter round, they installed flooring. I suppose they removed the last row near the gap and replaced it. In doing so they did not meet the minimum six inch end-joint spacing as is the flooring standard(See [redacted] Installation Instructions and references from web-sites below.) Also refer to Attachements. JPG, 05-end joints (2).JPG, 05-end joints.JPG It appears that the transition molding around the hearth was replaced and the gap there is no longer visible but it does appear nails were used as well as the glue (Attachment 5-hearth.JPG) I would like to be assured that the transition molding is not nailed to the bamboo flooring but is nailed to the subfloor I want the floors installed accordingly to installation directions from [redacted] Floors. Please note past correspondence and photos also in correspondence "inch" gap should be "1/inch". Below is exerpt from [redacted] installation instructions. Please note the lines in red as pertaining to installation and problems with the installation done by [redacted] Floors. Following the [redacted] instructions are web-sites where I found verification of the 6" spacing between end-joints of adjoining rows and 1/2" expansion gap around the perimeter of the room. Sincerely,
[redacted]
August
[redacted]
Dear Mr[redacted],
On July 3, [redacted] Floors
installed a [redacted] floating floor at [redacted]. When your employees were
about four to five rows into the install I noticed that they were not leaving a
two inch expansion gap around the perimeter as the manufacturer suggested. I told the gentleman that there should be a
two inch gap but he told me that it was needed only at the two sides of the
room where the boards met the walls horizontally. I tried to explain to him that the
manufacturer recommended the two inch gap on each wall. He didn't seem to think I knew what I was
talking about even though I was the one who hired [redacted] Floors to do the
work. I went to my residence which is a
mile from the job site to retrieve the instructions and called [redacted]
Floors. I was told you were at an
appointment and you or someone else would call me or show up at the siteI
gave my brother's cell phone number to call as he was at the site. I returned to the site with the instructions
from [redacted] Floors and showed the man installing the floors. He again tried to explain that the two inch
expansion gap was not needed. I went
into another part of the house to do some work and waited for the phone call or
for someone the show up.
When your employees got to
the doorway between the den and the foyer they were going to install straight
into the foyer without T-molding. I told
him that between rooms T-molding had to be installed per the manufacturer with
a two inch gap. I hoped they
complied. The T-molding is there, I'm
not sure about the gap.
Upon review of the
installation, the transition between the den and dining room is
questionable. I did not like where the
reducer was installed. It should have
been installed halfway between the door frame as was done on the other
doorway. A nice job was done around the
hearth, but I feel the same trim used around the hearth should have continued
in front of the cabinet which is next to the hearth The same trim used between the kitchen and den
should have been used against the side of the kitchen cabinet instead of quarter
round.
Mr[redacted], you came on July
to inspect the install and discuss it me.
You offered the option the correct the install between the den and
dining room saying that the correction would not look rightYou told me the
rest of the install was good. You also
said the floors will not buckle even though there is not a two inch expansion
gap around the perimeter of the rooms I have since been to [redacted] and
showed a salesman pictures of the installYes, the 2" expansion gap is needed
and though other concerns mentioned above were acceptable, they could have been
done betterTo get the piece to look right between the den/dining room,
den/kitchen coping the pieces should be done.___________________________________________________________________________... /> On July 24, , I sent you
this e-mail:
7/24/
[redacted],
After some thought, I would like the Transition
piece halfway though the doorway. Also I would like to discuss the other
issues I brought to your attention earlier. The quarter round under the
den bookcase and kitchen cabinets. I think there is a way to make it look
better by using more transition pieces or coping the pieces installed.
Waiting your reply.
[redacted] ______________________________________________________________________________ /> I have not heard from you since and have held final payment until
the issues are resolved.
I would like for you to come
back and fix the transition problems mentioned above; between the den and
dining room, in front of the den cabinet near the hearth and
kitchen/den/cabinet. I would also like a
guarantee that the floors will not buckle as they were not installed with the
recommended two inch expansion gap around the perimeter. This guarantee would be transferable to the
next owners of the property.
Sincerely,
[redacted]______________________________________________________________________... [redacted] FLOORING INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
Groove side (away from wall)
FLOATING INSTALLATION
Provide perimeter
expansionThe expansion space is the
same as the thickness of the new flooring, example: 1/2" thick flooring will require 1/2"
expansionStart by placing spacers
against the wall at the short and long side of each plank and at a seam where
two planks joinIf the starting or ending wall is irregular, scribe or trace
the contour of the wall to the starter row of boards
(a), (b) Complete the first row
progressively building or locking together the shorter ends of the planksThe
short end seams do not fully lock until the next row of flooring is installed
(a) (b)
(c) The last plank in any row will need to be cut
Measure the distance between the wall and the surface of the last full plank
Make sure to allow for the spacerFiboards under 12" should be
edge-glued with carpenters PVA wood glueDo not use wood glue for the
installation of each plank
(d) Fiplanks can be cut
with a jig saw, miter saw, or table sawTIP: Clean cuts are achieved
using a thin kerf, carbide tipped saw bladeRecommend the use of tooth saw
bladesBlade cut rotation should cut into the décor or finished side of the
plank[redacted] 2/26/Page (c) (d)
(e) Ideally, the remaining pieces cut
off from planks may serve as the starter or first plank in the next row(8"
minimum)
(f) Stagger new end-joints from previously
installed 10" apart, or a minimum of 6" to avoid seam line-up
(g) The last row each board should be
edge-glued if they are under 3" in width
(e) (f) (g)
SECOND AND
CONSECUTIVE ROWS AND INDIVIDUAL BOARDS
(h) Position the first plank of the
second row with the short end-side against a wall spacerNext engage the long
tongue side into the groove of the first row at approximately a 45º angle until
planks fit together
(i) Gradually
lower the plank down flat until the joint closes(remove any trash or debris
that may interfere with locking planks)
(j & 2)
The remaining planks on each row will lock into the long side first and then
fold down into the previous plank installedContinue this until row is
completeFollow steps 4,5, and on all remaining rows
(h) (i)
(j1) (j2)
LAST ROWS
(k) Measure and cut to sufficient
width and allow for the recommended expansion gap
(l) Scribe or
trace contours for the last row
(m) Planks less that 3" will need to be glued around all the edges
using a PVA wood glue
[redacted] 2/26/Page
(k) (l) (m)
Expansion
breaks
Allow
floor movement independent of other connected roomsAny room or connected
areas greater than 30' feet in any direction must have expansion breaks
placed into the flooringExpansion breaks and T-Molding transitions must be
installed between adjoining rooms, connections in hallways and at all doorways
Failure to meet these requirements can result in the floor buckling, separating
or gapping
Removing
the Lip or locking system, as needed
In areas where
it is difficult to angle the planks up into position, such as around/under door
moldings or jams, kitchen cabinetry or older type heat registers, it may be
necessary to remove the lip or locking system from the groove edge of the
planks you are fitting toThis is done by lightly scraping or planning off the
lip only on the groove side of the plankThis will allow you to install the
plank without tilting at a After the lip has been trimmed on the planks you
are fitting to, lay the plank flat on the floor
Apply a thin
bead of carpenter's (PVA) wood glue on top of the tongue and the bottom groove
of the receiving board, push the planks into positionImmediately wipe off any
excess glue with a damp cloth
CUTTING
AROUND PIPES
Measure the distance from the wall to
the center of the pipe
Mark the plank
where the hole for the pipe will be drilledRemember to allow for the spacer
Small parts should be fitted together using wood glue [redacted] 2/26/Page Measure the diameter of the pipeDrill the hole in the plank
½" larger than the diameter of the pipeIf the hole for the pipe is
located in the center of the plank, make a cut perpendicular to the long side
of the plankThe cut should be made going directly through the holeIf
the hole for the pipe is located near the edge of the plank, make two 45º angle
cuts to the hole from the side of the plank closest to the holeYou
can now position the two pieces around the pipeApply a bead of wood glue to
the cut edge of the fill piece and press into placeImmediately wipe off any
excess glue from the surface with a damp clothUse a wedge and hold in place
until glue driesMinor gaps can be filled with close matching wood filler
The expansion space around the
perimeter of the pipe shall be completely filled with a silicone caulking
STEP
APPLICATIONS
Stair parts
should be nailed and glued for safetyDue to the complexity of stair
installation and local building codes, it is highly recommended to consult with
a professorial flooring installer or our Technical department for stair
installation advice
FINISHING
Remove spacers from perimeter of
room
Install transition moldings directly to the
subflooringPre-drill and hand nail transitions moldings to wood subfloors
using 6d finishing nailsUse a wood urethane tube adhesive to bond wood/bamboo
transitions to concrete subfloors
Install quarter round or baseboard
moldingMoldings must be sufficient size to cover the expansion spaceDo not
fasten moldings through the flooring, fasten to the wallIt is best to
pre-drill and hand nail strand bamboo quarter round moldings using 3d finishing
nails, due to its unique hardnessFor best appearance fill nail holes with
close matching wood filler
When moving furniture protect the
flooring by using wood floor approved furniture mover glides
Use coasters or proper felt
protectors under the legs of furniture to prevent scratches
[redacted] BAMBOO flooring cleaned
using the [redacted] Floor Care kit, or cleaned with cleaners safe for urethane
finishesDo not flood mop the floor, or use abrasive cleanersNever use
[redacted] oil soap or [redacted] on [redacted] flooring
Chipping edges, dents and scratches
are site related, not warrantable.____________________________________________________________________... boards should vary in length by at least inches so the end joints will be staggered by at least inches from row to row.____________________________________________________________________________... boards at least inches to prevent an awkward alignment of end joints. ________________________________________________________________________________... Stagger Joints for a Natural LookStaggering joints provides a more natural, stable and professional looking bamboo floorTry to stagger end-joints in adjacent rows to be at least three times the width of the plankAvoid H-joints unless absolutely necessary Most homeowners can leave a standard ½ inch around the perimeter of the room to allow for expansion and contraction.____________________________________________________________________...

Complaint: [redacted]
I am rejecting this response because:
IT HAS NOT BEEN 7 DAYS SINCE 5/27. I WOULD LIKE TO REPLY THAT I AM NOT HAPPY WITH DILLEY FLOORS' RESPONSE AND PROPOSAL TO RESOLVE THIS DISPUTE.  THEY HAVE NOT INSTALLED THE FLOORS TO STANDARDS SET FORTH IN THE INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE MANUFACTURER AND HAVE NOT FIXED THE END JOINT PROBLEM. THEY HAVE NOT CONFIRMED WHETHER OR NOT THE TRANSITION PIECES INSTALLED AROUND THE HEARTH ARE GLUED OR HAVE THEY ALSO BEEN NAILED TO THE SUBFLOOR OR THE FLOORING ITSELF. 
 
[redacted]
 
 
 
Sincerely,
[redacted]

Complaint: [redacted]
I am rejecting this response because:IT HAS NOT BEEN 7 DAYS SINCE 5/27. I WOULD LIKE TO REPLY THAT I AM NOT HAPPY WITH DILLEY FLOORS' RESPONSE AND PROPOSAL TO RESOLVE THIS DISPUTE.  THEY HAVE NOT INSTALLED THE FLOORS TO STANDARDS SET FORTH IN THE INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE MANUFACTURER AND HAVE NOT FIXED THE END JOINT PROBLEM. THEY HAVE NOT CONFIRMED WHETHER OR NOT THE TRANSITION PIECES INSTALLED AROUND THE HEARTH ARE GLUED OR HAVE THEY ALSO BEEN NAILED TO THE SUBFLOOR OR THE FLOORING ITSELF.  [redacted]
   
Sincerely,
[redacted]

Complaint: [redacted]
I am rejecting this response because: there are a lot of falsifications within this response. [redacted] did not in fact observe a sump pump in my basement. I advised him that I do have a sump pump in my basement. If he had observed the sump pump in my basement, he would have also observed a dehumidifier in my basement that runs to remove any moisture .
 
Also, there was never any leaks in the bathroom as [redacted] alleges. The finish he is refering to  on the bathroom floor is another example of poor and defective materials. I understand that wood expands and contracts, however, not to the extent in which  I have explained. 
 
Another issue which has not been addressed are the nails that are protruding through the floor, yet again exhibiting poor and defective materials.  I feel that even though  it is 5 years after installation, I was advised upon purchasing this wood floor that it would last at least 20 years because of the way the floor is manufactured.  To me this means that the flooring is either defective and/or the installation was not completed properly.  
I am simply asking that the matter be rectified as I feel that 5 years is not unreasonable given the expectation that the floor would last at least 20 years a before proceeding further.
Respectfully, 
Michael Coviello

Review: Had a contract with Dilley Floors to install pre-finshed"clic" floating floors. There was a problem with the installation, came to repair their mistakes on three occasions. The work is still not done properly. I even sent them a copy of the installation instructions from the manufacturer of the floors.Desired Settlement: I'd like Dilley Floors, refund my payment of $200 for the repair of their mistake, refund $134.83 for the materials I had to purchase for them to repair their mess and the repair the flooring properly and to the standards set in the installation instructions for the flooring.

Business

Response:

In July of 2014 Dilley Floors LLC was contracted by Mrs. [redacted] to install flooring that she had purchased from [redacted] On July 3rd, 2014 we installed her product. After we finished installing the preferred way that I have done for 50 years, Mrs. [redacted] did not like it. She wanted an excessive expansion gap around the perimeter. We went back at our cost and made corrections to fit Mrs. [redacted]' stipulations. She was happy and paid us.Approximately eight months later Mrs. [redacted] called and said that the floor had shrunk and asked if we could fix it at her cost. Mrs. [redacted] had been concerned about buckling when, in fact, the opposite occurred. The floor shrunk.Two of my men and I went back to rectify the problem. The flooring was bamboo that she had bought from [redacted] and was manufactured in [redacted]. It was a very inferior product. We have worked with bamboo for the past 20 years and have never seen it shrink. Mrs. [redacted] is placing the blame in the wrong place. She should pursue her issues with [redacted] Sincerely,[redacted]Dilley Floors LLC

Consumer

Response:

Review: [redacted]

Mr [redacted] said he has been doing this for 50 years. HE did not install the floors. Men working for his company installed the floors. If he or his employees were unfamiliar with installing pre-finished "clic" ( floating )bamboo flooring he should have refused the job or asked for the installation instructions.Per my meeting with [redacted] prior to the last repair, ( believe it was March 20th, [redacted] said they were going to install quarter round over the gap against the dining room/foyer wall. Fix the gaps surrounding the den/foyer wall. Fix the gap in front of the hearth and a gap in the flooring to the right of the hearth. He said I had eonugh flooring left over to cover the fix. I supplied quarter round. When the men from [redacted] came to repair on March 26, 2015, my brother

called and said they needed more flooring. I purchased more flooring

and transition pieces and glue. They did not install the quarter round, they installed flooring. I suppose they removed the last row near the gap and replaced it. In doing so they did not meet the minimum six inch end-joint spacing as is the flooring standard. (See [redacted] Installation Instructions and references from web-sites below.) Also refer to Attachements. JPG, 05-2015 end joints (2).JPG, 05-2015 end joints.JPG . It appears that the transition molding around the hearth was replaced and the gap there is no longer visible but it does appear nails were used as well as the glue (Attachment 5-2015 hearth.JPG) I would like to be assured that the transition molding is not nailed to the bamboo flooring but is nailed to the subfloor. I want the floors installed accordingly to installation directions from [redacted] Floors. Please note past correspondence and photos also in correspondence "2 inch" gap should be "1/2 inch". Below is exerpt from [redacted] installation instructions. Please note the lines in red as pertaining to installation and problems with the installation done by [redacted] Floors. Following the [redacted] instructions are web-sites where I found verification of the 6" spacing between end-joints of adjoining rows and 1/2" expansion gap around the perimeter of the room. Sincerely,

[redacted]

August

10. 2014

Dear Mr. [redacted],

On July 3, 2014 [redacted] Floors

installed a [redacted] floating floor at [redacted]. When your employees were

about four to five rows into the install I noticed that they were not leaving a

two inch expansion gap around the perimeter as the manufacturer suggested. I told the gentleman that there should be a

two inch gap but he told me that it was needed only at the two sides of the

room where the boards met the walls horizontally. I tried to explain to him that the

manufacturer recommended the two inch gap on each wall. He didn’t seem to think I knew what I was

talking about even though I was the one who hired [redacted] Floors to do the

work. I went to my residence which is a

mile from the job site to retrieve the instructions and called [redacted]

Floors. I was told you were at an

appointment and you or someone else would call me or show up at the site. I

gave my brother’s cell phone number to call as he was at the site. I returned to the site with the instructions

from [redacted] Floors and showed the man installing the floors. He again tried to explain that the two inch

expansion gap was not needed. I went

into another part of the house to do some work and waited for the phone call or

for someone the show up.

When your employees got to

the doorway between the den and the foyer they were going to install straight

into the foyer without T-molding. I told

him that between rooms T-molding had to be installed per the manufacturer with

a two inch gap. I hoped they

complied. The T-molding is there, I’m

not sure about the gap.

Upon review of the

installation, the transition between the den and dining room is

questionable. I did not like where the

reducer was installed. It should have

been installed halfway between the door frame as was done on the other

doorway. A nice job was done around the

hearth, but I feel the same trim used around the hearth should have continued

in front of the cabinet which is next to the hearth. The same trim used between the kitchen and den

should have been used against the side of the kitchen cabinet instead of quarter

round.

Mr. [redacted], you came on July

8 to inspect the install and discuss it me.

You offered the option the correct the install between the den and

dining room saying that the correction would not look right. You told me the

rest of the install was good. You also

said the floors will not buckle even though there is not a two inch expansion

gap around the perimeter of the rooms. I have since been to [redacted] and

showed a salesman pictures of the install. Yes, the 2” expansion gap is needed

and though other concerns mentioned above were acceptable, they could have been

done better. To get the piece to look right between the den/dining room,

den/kitchen coping the pieces should be done.___________________________________________________________________________... />
On July 24, 2014 , I sent you

this e-mail:

7/24/14

[redacted],

After some thought, I would like the Transition

piece halfway though the doorway. Also I would like to discuss the other

issues I brought to your attention earlier. The quarter round under the

den bookcase and kitchen cabinets. I think there is a way to make it look

better by using more transition pieces or coping the pieces installed.

Waiting your reply.

[redacted] ______________________________________________________________________________ />
I have not heard from you since and have held final payment until

the issues are resolved.

I would like for you to come

back and fix the transition problems mentioned above; between the den and

dining room, in front of the den cabinet near the hearth and

kitchen/den/cabinet. I would also like a

guarantee that the floors will not buckle as they were not installed with the

recommended two inch expansion gap around the perimeter. This guarantee would be transferable to the

next owners of the property.

Sincerely,

[redacted]______________________________________________________________________... [redacted] FLOORING INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS

Groove side (away from wall)

FLOATING INSTALLATION

1. Provide perimeter

expansion. The expansion space is the

same as the thickness of the new flooring, example: 1/2” thick flooring will require 1/2”

expansion. Start by placing spacers

against the wall at the short and long side of each plank and at a seam where

two planks join. If the starting or ending wall is irregular, scribe or trace

the contour of the wall to the starter row of boards.

(a), (b) Complete the first row

progressively building or locking together the shorter ends of the planks. The

short end seams do not fully lock until the next row of flooring is installed.

(a) (b)

2 (c) The last plank in any row will need to be cut.

Measure the distance between the wall and the surface of the last full plank.

Make sure to allow for the spacer. Fill-in boards under 12” should be

edge-glued with carpenters PVA wood glue. Do not use wood glue for the

installation of each plank.

(d) Fill-in planks can be cut

with a jig saw, miter saw, or table saw. TIP: Clean cuts are achieved

using a thin kerf, carbide tipped saw blade. Recommend the use of 60 tooth saw

blades. Blade cut rotation should cut into the décor or finished side of the

plank. [redacted] 2/26/2015 Page 9 (c) (d)

3 (e) Ideally, the remaining pieces cut

off from planks may serve as the starter or first plank in the next row. (8”

minimum)

(f) Stagger new end-joints from previously

installed 10” apart, or a minimum of 6” to avoid seam line-up.

(g) The last row each board should be

edge-glued if they are under 3” in width.

(e) (f) (g)

SECOND AND

CONSECUTIVE ROWS AND INDIVIDUAL BOARDS

1 (h) Position the first plank of the

second row with the short end-side against a wall spacer. Next engage the long

tongue side into the groove of the first row at approximately a 45º angle until

planks fit together.

(i) Gradually

lower the plank down flat until the joint closes. (remove any trash or debris

that may interfere with locking planks)

(j 1 & 2)

The remaining planks on each row will lock into the long side first and then

fold down into the previous plank installed. Continue this until row is

complete. Follow steps 4,5, and 6 on all remaining rows.

(h) (i)

(j1) (j2)

LAST ROWS

2 (k) Measure and cut to sufficient

width and allow for the recommended expansion gap.

(l) Scribe or

trace contours for the last row

(m) Planks less that 3” will need to be glued around all the edges

using a PVA wood glue.

[redacted] 2/26/2015 Page

10 (k) (l) (m)

Expansion

breaks

Allow normal

floor movement independent of other connected rooms. Any room or connected

areas greater than 30’ feet in any direction must have expansion breaks

placed into the flooring. Expansion breaks and T-Molding transitions must be

installed between adjoining rooms, connections in hallways and at all doorways.

Failure to meet these requirements can result in the floor buckling, separating

or gapping.

Removing

the Lip or locking system, as needed

In areas where

it is difficult to angle the planks up into position, such as around/under door

moldings or jams, kitchen cabinetry or older type heat registers, it may be

necessary to remove the lip or locking system from the groove edge of the

planks you are fitting to. This is done by lightly scraping or planning off the

lip only on the groove side of the plank. This will allow you to install the

plank without tilting at a 45. After the lip has been trimmed on the planks you

are fitting to, lay the plank flat on the floor.

Apply a thin

bead of carpenter’s (PVA) wood glue on top of the tongue and the bottom groove

of the receiving board, push the planks into position. Immediately wipe off any

excess glue with a damp cloth

.

CUTTING

AROUND PIPES

1. Measure the distance from the wall to

the center of the pipe.

Mark the plank

where the hole for the pipe will be drilled. Remember to allow for the spacer.

Small parts should be fitted together using wood glue [redacted] 2/26/2015 Page 11 2. Measure the diameter of the pipe. Drill the hole in the plank

½” larger than the diameter of the pipe. 3. If the hole for the pipe is

located in the center of the plank, make a cut perpendicular to the long side

of the plank. The cut should be made going directly through the hole. 4. If

the hole for the pipe is located near the edge of the plank, make two 45º angle

cuts to the hole from the side of the plank closest to the hole. 5. You

can now position the two pieces around the pipe. Apply a bead of wood glue to

the cut edge of the fill piece and press into place. Immediately wipe off any

excess glue from the surface with a damp cloth. Use a wedge and hold in place

until glue dries. Minor gaps can be filled with close matching wood filler.

6. The expansion space around the

perimeter of the pipe shall be completely filled with a silicone caulking.

STEP

APPLICATIONS

Stair parts

should be nailed and glued for safety. Due to the complexity of stair

installation and local building codes, it is highly recommended to consult with

a professorial flooring installer or our Technical department for stair

installation advice.

FINISHING

1. Remove spacers from perimeter of

room.

2. Install transition moldings directly to the

subflooring. Pre-drill and hand nail transitions moldings to wood subfloors

using 6d finishing nails. Use a wood urethane tube adhesive to bond wood/bamboo

transitions to concrete subfloors.

3. Install quarter round or baseboard

molding. Moldings must be sufficient size to cover the expansion space. Do not

fasten moldings through the flooring, fasten to the wall. It is best to

pre-drill and hand nail strand bamboo quarter round moldings using 3d finishing

nails, due to its unique hardness. For best appearance fill nail holes with

close matching wood filler.

4. When moving furniture protect the

flooring by using wood floor approved furniture mover glides.

5. Use coasters or proper felt

protectors under the legs of furniture to prevent scratches.

6. [redacted] BAMBOO flooring cleaned

using the [redacted] Floor Care kit, or cleaned with cleaners safe for urethane

finishes. Do not flood mop the floor, or use abrasive cleaners. Never use

[redacted] oil soap or [redacted] on [redacted] flooring.

7. Chipping edges, dents and scratches

are site related, not warrantable.____________________________________________________________________... boards should vary in length by at least 6 inches so the end joints will be staggered by at least 6 inches from row to row.____________________________________________________________________________... boards at least 6 inches to prevent an awkward alignment of end joints. ________________________________________________________________________________... Stagger Joints for a Natural LookStaggering joints provides a more natural, stable and professional looking bamboo floor. Try to stagger end-joints in adjacent rows to be at least three times the width of the plank. Avoid H-joints unless absolutely necessary.

Review: Prefinished hardwood flooring was installed approximately 5 years ago. Dilley Floors had to come out to rectify some gaps in the floor shortly after completing install that same year. Now flooring is gaping in areas again which points to defective flooring or poor installation. Dilley Floors came out to inspect and stated that flooring is supposed to do this. While standard expansion and contraction is understood, floor gaps are beyond standard expansion and contraction. The owner stated he could get more flooring and fix the gaps. You could imagine that I was floored when I received an estimate for $300+ to complete the work on the flooring which was either defective or poorly installed to begin with! When I attempted to rectify this and give Dilley Floors the opportunity to make good on their job and fix their job which is clearly defective and/or poorly installed, they stated they only offer a 1 year warranty on workmanship and I would have to pay the $300+ to have the flooring fixed. A floor of this nature should last longer than 5 years, which leads me to believe that the flooring and/or quality of installation by Dilley Floors was poor to begin with! Not only are the floors gapping, but there are also various nail markings popping through some floor boards. Owners response was that this was normal.Desired Settlement: I would expect that Dilley Floors would stand behind their product and workmanship with regards to installation and replace the flooring that is gapping and damaged with nails as most companies would!

Business

Response:

Re: ID [redacted]

The purpose of this letter is to respond to [redacted] complaint concerning his expectation of a five year warranty for work performed in January of 2009.

Wood has the ability to absorb moisture and, in doing this, expand in size. When heat is applied to the atmosphere, the wood dries and then reverts to the original size. This puts stress on the wood and sometimes causes it to crack or split. Upon inspection of [redacted] home on April 3, 2014, I observed a sump pump in his basement. This indicates the existence of water. The sump pump will remove standing water but not the dampness of the basement. Over a period of 5 years this dampness and drying of the environment could have a huge effect on the wood in [redacted] home.

It is apparent that [redacted] bathroom had a leak. When wood gets wet from water it expands and pushes against adjoining boards. When it dries, there is not pressure to push the boards back to their original place; thus leaving a space.

Dilley Floors LLC offered to work on this area of the floor at a very reasonable price for labor and materials. [redacted] has declined our offer.

Dilley Floors LLC

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Description: Hardwood Floor Contractors, Hardwood Floor Maintenance, Floor Materials - Retail, Floors - Hardwood, Contractors - Flooring, Floor Laying, Refinishing & Resurfacing, Flooring Contractors (NAICS: 238330)

Address: 1432 Old Waterbury Rd Ste 1, Southbury, Connecticut, United States, 06488-3905

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